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Personal conversation during conference breaks beats digital communication hands-down

Update 2014-05-13: Spotify conversion rate, session moderator at Media Convention got it wrong.
Stefan Zilch CEO Spotify GmbH Germany clarifies – Spotify enjoys a 25 percent conversion rate from freemium to paid client status, not 30 percent (see comments – below).
See also comments by Johnny Haeusler – co-organiser – re-publica 2014.

We talk about the great, the good, the bad, and the ugly at two of this year’s Berlin Web Week components, re:publica 14 and concurrent Media Convention Berlin.
Plus, get pictures and videos, as well as six suggestions for improving re:publica 15.
Keywords#mcb14 #rp14analysisanalytics, contagious contentinfluenceKPImetricsreader comment, resonanceROIsocial sharing, media convention, re:publica 14, Berlin Web Week

CLICK IMAGE - media convention AND re:publica 14: Ideas, data and more: Do not forget to assess and evaluate what it means - the SOCIAL MEDIA AUDIT - GATTIKER #mcb14 #rp14Both re:publica 14 (May 6 – 8, 2014) and Media Convention Berlin (May 6 – 7, 2014) had their own hashtags, #rep14 and #mcb14, respectively, and both were held in the same location. On May 8, Media Convention Berlin’s venues were taken over by LinuxTag attendees and exhibitors.

re:publica 14 advertised itself as being the event of the year:

– three days,
– 500 speakers, and
– 250 hours of programming.

I had gotten myself a ticket for both re:publica 14 and Media Convention Berlin, and here are some of my impressions (of course, I was unable to attend all concurrent sessions, so my account is a partial view of both events).

The Great

Somebody told me I needed to attend Teresa Bücker’s talk (30-minute video below), but I really wanted to attend the session, Supergeiler First Kiss – Viralität nur gegen Kohle (Stellar First Kiss – Virality Only Comes From Cash), but the session was overflowing and the doors had to be closed to comply with fire regulations.

So I had to find another session to attend, and chose Teresa’s. Probably a good thing, since it exposed me to something different. As Albert Einstein would have said, “If you attend a session understanding nearly all, get out of there, choose another presentation or panel where you know little to widen your horizon.” That is what Teresa’s talk offered me, new insights.

[youtube]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=khX9Hd0s3iU[/youtube]

Her talk ‘early’ (i.e. some of us had sufficiently recovered from our night on the town so we were up and able to attend) on Wednesday illustrated some activism issues, namely how tough, time-consuming and nerve-wracking it can be to be an online activist. This was a personal account of somebody trying to move and shape things in the political arena using social media, and she was engaging as she shared her tribulations, failures and successes.

Because of this I thought I needed to attend the afternoon workshop with Teresa Bücker and Ingrid Brodnig (check out Ingrid’s VERY interesting blog, see also her fascinating book, which she gave me to read). The workshop gave Ingrid an opportunity to present her ideas and experiences with managing comments on user forums, blogs and so forth. This interesting session’s focus was on traditional media outlets (e.g., newspapers) having online forums. It also gave us the chance to ask some questions for which there was not enough time during Teresa’s morning session. Both Teresa and Ingrid gave us a run for our money, and a lively discussion evolved towards the end.

Among other ideas, Meike Rensch-Bergner (what a blog – go get ’em – check it out!), pointed out that sometimes you need a thick skin to deal with comments, and one cannot take them personally. Such acts of self-preservation seem necessary, especially when your blog or forum addresses a racier topic (Stern somehow managed to get Meike to blog for them on a sexier topic…).

Incidentally, a bigger room with decent seating that is more conducive to this type of work would have been nice, but c’est la vie.

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Gattiker, Urs E. (2014) Social Media Audit. Amsterdam, London, New York: Elsevier

Update 2014-05-15:  I got several copies shipped to me for free (not author copies – just as a thank you and “we apologise” from Elsevier). As I said elsewhere “shit happens but what matters is how you resolve the customer problem.” This is one way to do it, impressive I find. Check it out here

As the nom de plume of a woman called JK Rowling demonstrates, brand recognition in publishing is important:

The Cuckoo’s Calling sold only about 450 copies in UK hardback under Galbraith’s name after it was published in April but quickly became the top seller on Amazon once it was known to be a Rowling novel.”
(see Gapper, John (July 17, 2013) – The superstar still reigns supreme over publishing)

The follow-up, called “The Silkworm”, is to be published on June 19, 2014. If you have limited brand recognition as I do, the publisher is another factor that can really do you in. In other words, if their production and shipping process, including their online store, fail to deliver, you are in trouble.
CLICK IMAGE - Social Media Audit - ISBN 978-1-84334-745-3 -- ROI, KPI, BlogRank, CyTRAP, Urs E. Gattiker - Rave reviews src=This blog post discusses my experience with Elsevier’s e-store. It is all about failure to communicate and providing the service needed to clinch the sale. I should mention that my original independent publisher Chandos has been acquired by Elsevier, so I suddenly found myself being one of many authors, instead of one of a few at a successful smaller outfit. What a change…

Social Media Audit: Help Your Bottom Line (Elsevier BWL/Mgmt) – 2014 – Author: Urs E. Gattiker, PhD

I thought I would share some of my journey from finishing the proofs until the copy arrives in the mail (still waiting).

Keywords: bigfail, customer feedback, KPI, outsource, onshore, metrics, performance, process management, quality of service, usability, trust

Let’s order a few copies, no sweat!

To get the book as early as possible, I visited Elsevier’s e-store in January and placed my order. The problem started right there: the system wanted to charge me value-added tax (VAT). If the total value of the shipment is below CHF200, no VAT is charged at the border by Swiss authorities.

You think I am joking, but ask Jeff Bezos. Amazon.de, .fr, .co.uk, or .it all manage to get me my books across the border without VAT – and it’s completely legal.

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