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This blog entry is part of a series:

  1. WEF Davos 2019: Top 100 CEO bloggers (you are here)
  2. WEF Davos 2019: Die besten Chef Blogs (in German / auf Deutsch)
  3. WEF Davos: Cybersecurity and Blockchain
  4. WEF Davos: MCLago und Marketing (in German / auf Deutsch)

Summary: We published a #DrKPI WEF Davos blogger ranking for 20152016, and 2017.
This year we attended #WEF19 in Davos in person – a good reason to post another #DrKPI #BlogRank of the top 100 CEO blogs.
This post presents the 2019 rankings.

Being fashionable is transient, but public facing corporate blogs are here to stay. To illustrate,

53% of Fortune 500 and 55% of Inc 500 firms in the US have public facing blogs. Source: Center for Marketing Research at the University of Massachusetts Dartmouth.

53% of Fortune 500 and 55% of Inc 500 firms in the US have public facing blogs. Source: Center for Marketing Research at the University of Massachusetts Dartmouth.

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Every year the road to Davos is littered with companies that once appeared all-powerful, but later stumbled. For instance, former Yahoo CEO Marissa Mayer was an avid blogger until recently, and she is no longer attending WEF Davos. New people are showing up and telling us that going public and sharing experiences is each company’s, and its managers’, responsibility.

By the way, as in past years, climate change was an issue at this year’s WEF – naturally. Although we did not attend any of those sessions, we did our part by having the team use public transit, including taking the train to and from Davos. In Davos itself, we took the WEF shuttle or walked from one venue to the next.

World Economic Forum: Authentic CEOs aplenty

This year part of our team scored an invite and had a chance to visit the World Economic Forum. We had a great time and met some famous CEOs, including Jamie Dimon and Satya Nadella. So, we thought we would share some of our thoughts right here, and publish an updated #DrKPI #BlogRank for #WEFdavos in 2019.

iVault at Davos 2019: Jamie Dimon and Vault Security Systems AG

iVault at Davos 2019: Jamie Dimon and Vault Security Systems AG

Is blogging easy? Depends on who you ask. Most people think it’s easy – you just write a little, and that’s all there is to it. Personally, I think it requires a lot of time, attention, and creativity. And like anything creative, it has its moments of difficulty. But if we look at those attending Davos, one wonders.

The Harvard Business Review rankings of the top CEOs suggest that one key skill of these high performers is their ability to get their message across very effectively. But what about blogging? If a growing number of Fortune 500 companies have public facing blogs, their CEOs must know the drill. Right?

Well actually, we get a mixed picture, and once again, it depends on who you ask. CEOs may talk the talk, but many – like Stephanie Buscemi (log in with your email first, then click on this again to get the numbers) – fail to walk the walk.

Speaking at the World Economic Forum (WEF) in Davos, Switzerland, Salesforce chief marketing officer Stephanie Buscemi said companies need to have a "point of view".

Speaking at the World Economic Forum (WEF) in Davos, Switzerland, Salesforce chief marketing officer Stephanie Buscemi said companies need to have a “point of view”.

Take-away

While Salesforce may have a “point of view”, I certainly can’t figure out from her blog what Stephanie Buscemi stands for. Trumpeting her company’s products using marketing mumbo-jumbo isn’t exactly on topic, is it…
Does it present added value? I’m going to go with a big, fat, NO.

Microsoft CEO Satya Nadella and Apple CEO Tim Cook were pictured at dinner in Davos with Brazil’s far-right president Jair Bolsonaro.

Whenever he has the opportunity, Satya Nadella talks about our need for a global GDPR, and privacy being a human right. He did so in interviews and also during his WEF speech this year – but he fails to outline his position on his Microsoft blog. Another missed opportunity.

This is a blog that cries out for care, attention, and authenticity. Of the latter, Nadella has a whole truckload, so why doesn’t anyone at Microsoft help him translate it onto his blog for readers’ – or customers’ – benefit?

Satya Nadella asserted that there needs to be a GDPR for the world.

Satya Nadella asserted that there needs to be a GDPR for the world.

Take-away

Microsoft CEO wants a GDPR for the world. Maybe he should follow Stephanie Buscemi’s advice, and get a “point of view”.

Nadella surely has one. He also stands behind it. But a blog telling us a bit more about what he feels and how his company tackles this challenge would be helpful. What his PR staff is managing to spread is totally unauthentic statements… Another lost opportunity to hear from a CEO directly about such an important topic.

[su_box title=”World Economic Forum Davos: 4 things that distinguish successful c-suite bloggers from the rest – NOW 6 facts” box_color=”#86bac5″ title_color=”#ffffff” radius=”5″ width=”px 700″ ]

Two years back we suggested:

    1. Staying on topic,
    2. Posting regularly,
    3. Answering reader comments, and
    4. Benchmarking your blog (seeing what works best for you).

This year we could maybe add

  • Being authentic,
  • Avoiding navel gazing or inward-looking entries… provide your audience with added value.

Incidentally, added value is unlikely to mean talking about your company’s product. Unfortuntely, Salesforce chief marketer Stephanie Buscemi does just that – about every 6 months or so.

As a marketing guru, your main job is to know what clients want. As well, you need to make sure that know-how flows into product development. But posts touting your company’s product do not cut the mustard.

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Ranking CEO (top management) bloggers for WEF Davos 2019

CLICK on IMAGE - DrKPI - Top 100 CEO bloggers.We publish our DrKPI BlogRank: Top 100 CEO Bloggers every year (find more on the website).

These numbers can be at your fingertips! Just bookmark this entry – Top blogs of Davos 2019 | World Economic Forum from DrKPI® BlogRank, and you are all set.

[su_box title=”Five WEF Davos 2017 Top 100 Blogs you want to bookmark” box_color=”#86bac5″ title_color=”#ffffff” radius=”5″ width=”px 700″ ]
Important blog missing – yours! Please sign up right now, and get your blog’s numbers mailed to your inbox.

  1. Log in with your email at https://DrKPI.com,
  2. Click on any link below, and you’ll see the charts and figures.

Here are the links you need:

  1. Overall list – WEF Davos 2019 Top 100 CEO bloggers – Christine Lagarde – IMF
  2. Details – Content Strategy – WEF Davos 2019 Top 100 CEO bloggers – Arman Sarhaddar – Vault Security Systems
  3. Details – Brand Image and Impact – WEF Davos 2019 Top 100 CEO Bloggers – Erna Solberg – Prime Minister of Norway
  4. Details – Conversation and Social Sharing – WEF Davos 2019 Top 100 CEO Bloggers – Ron Tolido – Capgemini

Check out the table below!

Erna Solbgerg does not link to other material on the web, her blog is about her opinions. Christine Lagarde has co-authors whom she publishes with, saves her time while ensuring high-quality content. Arman Sarhaddar has just started as a blogger, but does very well.

And another thing, why have a blog when you do not allow your readers to comment? Even if you do you will not get that many since it takes time and effort. Oh, and thought.

By the way, Mr. Edelman – successful blogger in previous years – no longer blogs and the website is a useability nightmare.

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Here are some other things to consider.

[su_box title=”World Economic Forum Davos: 3 beginner mistakes even pros make.” box_color=”#86bac5″ title_color=”#ffffff” radius=”5″ width=”px 700″ ]

1. A Hashtag strategy is a must

The WEF has put out the #WEF19 hashtag, but most people cannot find it on its website. Many others are also being used, such as  #Davos2019. Whatever you do, use at least three hashtags to make your post easy to find.

Tweet about this post or share it on LinkedIn. Here’s an example of how this could work using hashtags:

#DrKPI’s annual #WEF #BlogRank with #metrics2watch:
https://blog.drkpi.com/ranking-top-manager-blog/
for the Top 100 #CEO #Blogger at #WEFdavos #WEF19 #Davos2019

2. Blogging or sharing content in a high-walled garden is not smart. Really.

I appreciate all CEOs that share their thoughts and off the cuff remarks on, for instance, LinkedIn. But let us not forget, you are more likely to reach those that think like you do (fellow managers, CEOs, wannabes and so forth) in an echo chamber or a fenced yard like LinkedIn.

Is that really the target group of customers that you want to or must reach? Probably not. As if this is not reason enough, no search engine will index your entry on LinkedIn and within a day or two, people will be unable to find it on this platform.

So get your own blog and curate content that interests your target audience(s) by providing them added value.

3. Preventing the crawling of your site does not help

Some bloggers do a great job (e.g., Christine Lagarde). But please, make sure your robots.txt file is set up so search engines can crawl and index your blog. I’m looking at you, Christine.

Of course, George Colony: The Counterintuitive CEO may not care, since he is already famous. But for those of you who aren’t famous (yet), beware… Here is some help for non-geeks on how to set up your robots.txt file correctly.[/su_box]

Have your say –  join the conversation

Source: WEF Davos 2019: Top 100 CEO bloggers

What is your opinion?

– Who is your favorite top management, c-suite or CEO blogger?
– What would you recommend a CEO blogger such as Jean-Pascal Tricoire (CEO of Schneider Electric) do to get more reader comments (8,000 reads BUT 0 reader comments)?
– Since it takes Elon Musk six days to go from having an idea to its execution, what would you recommend he do to revive his stale blog?

More about DrKPI BlogRank – the Hit Parade

Declaration of Conflicting Interests

The author declares that he had no conflict of interest with respect to the content, authorship or publication of this blog entry.

[su_box title=”WEF Davos 2017 Top 100 Bloggers: How it works” box_color=”#86bac5″ title_color=”#ffffff” radius=”5″ width=”px 700″ ]
We did not just gather the over 100 CEO / c-suite blogs we liked best. Instead, our DrKPI® BlogRank picked those that feature the most informative, knowledgeable and experience-driven insights, using objective indicators.

We also analyse writing style and visual effects, as well as how much reader engagement, dialogue and ripple is generated by marketing content published on the blog.

100 is the highest possible grade for each indicator. The average within the group of blogs being ranked or all blogs (see table below) is 50.
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Top 100 CEO blogs

Learn more about the table from the above blog entry below.

  1. Log in with your email at https://DrKPI.com,
  2. Click this link and you’ll see the charts and figures below.

Register your own blog right here!

WEF Davos 2019 - the top CEO bloggers - the best of the corporate blogcrowd from DrKPI BlogRank.

WEF Davos 2019 – the top CEO bloggers – thebest of the corporate blogcrowd from DrKPI BlogRank.

See some Kodak moments from WEF 2019 below

[su_carousel source=”media:5653,5652,5651,5650,5649,5648, 5647,5646,5645,5644,5643,5642,5641,5640,5638,5639″ link=”image” target=”blank” responsive=”yes” title=”no” arrows=”yes” pages=”no” mousewheel=”yes”speed=”1500″]

… or our impressions video for iVAULT, the brand by Vault Security Systems AG here:

WEF Davos - what are the blogging trends|Copyright: Petunyia | Fotolia #127707380

Summary: We published a #DrKPI WEF Davos blogger ranking for 2015 and 2016. This post presents the 2017 rankings, as well as:

Being fashionable is transient, but corporate blogs are here to stay. To illustrate, a 2009-2010 study reported that 23 percent of Fortune 500 companies had at least one corporate blog. In 2016, 181 Fortune 500 companies, or 36 percent had corporate blogs for content marketing purposes (see UMass Center for Marketing Research).

Blogs are a more personable way to communicate, and most importantly, foster dialogue with readers.

Interesting read: The no-bullsh*t guide to better blogging

♥ Curious? Join 1,500+ other subscribers to this blog’s newsletter, and read on!♥

Every year the road to Davos is littered with companies that once appeared all-powerful, but later stumbled. For instance, Yahoo’s former CEO, Marissa Mayer was an avid blogger until recently, is not attending WEF Davos this year.

[su_box title=”World Economic Forum Davos: 4 things successful c-suite bloggers do better” box_color=”#86bac5″ title_color=”#ffffff” radius=”5″ width=”px 700″ ]

Checklist

  1. Staying on topic vs. Trumping
  2. Posting regularly
  3. Answering reader comments
  4. Benchmarking your blog – see what works best for you

Get answers to this checklist below.
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1. Michelle Obama and staying on topic

Some have argued, “One of the biggest flaws that we see in CEO blogs is lack of focus.”

A good point, but this statement is too general. Imagine if Michelle Obama had decided to write a blog during her time at the White House. What her topic of choice might have been would not have mattered much. She could have written about human rights, her travels or shared her ideas about gardening, and countless people would have been interested to read this material.

Of course, writing about a topic you care about makes things easier. For most folks, delivering on a narrower topic helps, but different rules apply for famous people.

Take-away

The more famous you are among your target audience, the less focus matters for your blog content. Writing about a trip to the store, corporate policy meetings, and so forth can be part of the package.

You can be audacious like Mr. Trump… But your compliance folks will have a fit.

2. Guy Kawasaki and building relationships

Building relationships or friendships requires that you invest time and maintain regular contact. For instance, Guy Kawasaki posts once or twice a year, but the The Blog Maverick (Mark Cuban) has managed to post just about every month over many years.

The results speak for themselves: Mark Cuban has a much higher dedicated readership than Guy Kawasaki, even though social media pundits may feel differently. But those are the numbers.

Take-away

Don’t begin your blog by posting twice a week. Look at it as a ten-year marathon or even longer. Start off slowly, at a pace that you can maintain throughout the race. Continue the journey by posting content every three to five weeks.

3. Peter Brabeck-Lethmathe: Actions speak louder than words

Unless you really focus on reader comments, you should drop your blog. You might as well tell corporate communications to handle your media work for you, because it will not stand out… but you will be in good company, I am sorry to say.

As a CEO that reaches out and blogs, you need to be authentic. Peter Brabeck-Letmathe (Chariman of Nestlé Group and Formula 1) manages this very well. Two things make his CEO blog different:

  1. He receives reader comments – in contrast to many c-suite blogs that do not, AND
  2. Peter tries to respond from time to time if the comment requires a thoughtful reply.

However, recently he has failed to post regularly, which is a real shame. Also, you have to carefully monitor the comments that are left on your blog. Some people seem to forget. In turn, they may end up having several spam-type comments published among more thoughtful reader comments. A pity.

Take-away

Taking the time to reply to thoughtful reader comments makes you authentic. As importantly, it shows that you value your readers’ time. But please, moderate your reader comments to prevent spam getting published.

WEF Davos - Data about the DrKPI BlogRank: Best 100 CEO Bloggers | Copyright: Rawpixel.com | Fotolia #101962153

WEF Davos – Data about the DrKPI BlogRank: Best 100 CEO Bloggers
Copyright: Rawpixel.com | Fotolia #101962153

4. Peter F. Drucker: Metrics can help you improve performance

When I was a student, Peter F. Drucker once told me (I am paraphrasing his words):

Urs, how do you know you did well? You must define success beforehand, then measure your performance.

Of course, not everything should or can be measured.

Trying to assess how much Air Conditioning adds to your bottom line or return on investment (ROI) seems useless. Nevertheless, keeping your offices cool during summer seems sensible.

Hence, a CEO or c-suite executive should define success for their blog and then try to measure it. Comparing one’s performance to other similar blogs makes sense, and puts your work in context.

Take-away

When benchmarking oneself it helps to focus on best practice and the blog’s trendline. We can see if our level of resonance and the ripple our content gets on the social web is comparable. Necessary changes can help improve performance in the subsequent quarter.

Ranking CEO (top management) bloggers for WEF Davos 2017

CLICK on IMAGE - DrKPI - Top 100 CEO bloggers.We publish our DrKPI BlogRank: Top 100 CEO Bloggers every year (find more on the website).

These numbers can be at your fingertips; just bookmark this entry, Top blogs of Davos 2017 | World Economic Forum, and you are all set.

[su_box title=”Five WEF Davos 2017 Top 100 Blogs you want to bookmark” box_color=”#86bac5″ title_color=”#ffffff” radius=”5″ width=”px 700″ ]
Important blog missing – yours! Please sign up right now and get the numbers.

Here are the links you need:

1. Overall list – WEF Davos 2017 Top 100 CEO bloggers – Christine Lagarde – IMF
2. Details – WEF Davos 2017 Best 100 CEO Bloggers – Richard Edelman – Edelman Trust Barometer
3. Details – Content Strategy – WEF Davos 2017 – Dr Francis Collins, NIH Director
4. Details – Brand Image and Impact – WEF Davos 2017 Best 100 CEO Bloggers – Maler Heyse
5. Details – Conversation and Social Sharing – WEF Davos 2017 Best 100 CEO Bloggers – Ron Tolido – Capgemini

Check out the table below!
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By the way, many luminaries attending this year’s WEF blog too rarely (minimum one entry in the last 90 days) to be included (e.g., Sharan Burrow, General Secretary of the International Trade Union Confederation).

Make sure that your robots.txt file is set up so search engines can crawl and index your blog. Of course, George Colony: The Counterintuitive CEO may not care, since he is already famous. But if you are not, beware… here is some help for non-geeks on how to set up your robots.txt file correctly.

[su_box title=”WEF Davos CEO Bloggers: Three lessons learned” box_color=”#86bac5″ title_color=”#ffffff” radius=”5″ width=”px 700″ ]
The superstar reigns supreme in the media, publishing and blogging business. If you are famous or have a well-known brand (e.g., your company), it helps tremendously. So if you have left Google or Red Bull, this will separate the wheat from the chaff. Are you still in the top ranks or has your ripple / engagement dropped like a stone?

Below we have used high performing bloggers in one of the three areas we measure and interpreted their high score. We explain why they did so well.

1. Content Marketing & Strategy (Blogger: Randy Tinseth – Boeing)

Randy’s headlines are short and attention-grabbing. His writing style is also to the point – short sentences and paragraphs are the norm. Loved by mobile users.

2. Brand Image and Brand Strength (Blogger: David Armano – Edelmann)

Naturally, how you present yourself, as well as your employer or company does matter. If you just share your thoughts or opinion, added value is not always easy to grasp for the casual reader.

David uses graphics and visuals nicely, but as importantly, he provides links to additional material on the company site and others. Quality is key.

3. Influence, Resonance and Social Shares (Blogger: Carsten Ulbricht – Bartsch Rechtsanwälte)

Readers who care or are inspired write comments. But often we are lucky if just 1 out of 1,000 readers shares a blog entry. If 1 out of 10,000 visitors writes a comment, we’re thrilled.

Social shares are a flash in the pan – important now, but gone in less than 10 seconds in my feed… They do little for building a long-term relationship with your clients or getting potential clients to talk about your product.

Bill Gates gets the best score = 100 for his social ripple, i.e. how his content is being shared on social networks, just above Richard Branson. Nevertheless, both have had zero reader comments over the last 90 days.
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Have your say –  join the conversation

Source: WEF Davos 2017: Best 100 CEO bloggers

What is your opinion?

– Who is your favorite top management, c-suite or CEO blogger?
– What would you recommend a CEO blogger such as Jean-Pascal Tricoire (CEO of Schneider Electric) do to get more reader comments (1,000 likes, 13,000 views BUT 0 reader comments)?
– Since it takes Elon Musk six days to go from having an idea to its execution, what would you recommend he do to revive his stale blog?

More about DrKPI BlogRank – the Hit Parade

Declaration of Conflicting Interests

The author declares that he had no conflict of interest with respect to the content, authorship or publication of this blog entry.

[su_box title=”WEF Davos 2017 Top 100 Bloggers: How it works” box_color=”#86bac5″ title_color=”#ffffff” radius=”5″ width=”px 700″ ]
We did not just gather the over 100 CEO / c-suite blogs we liked best. Instead, our DrKPI® BlogRank picked those that feature the most informative, knowledgeable and experience driven insights, using objective indicators. We also analyse writing style and visual effects, as well as how much reader engagement, dialogue and ripple is generated by marketing content published in the blog.

100 is the highest possible grade for each indicator. The average within the group of blogs being ranked or all blogs (see table below) is 50.
[/su_box]

Top 100 CEO blogs

Learn more about the table below from the above blog entry. Get the numbers below with this click.

Register your blog right her

WHAT do Branson, Gates, Obama, Musk, Xi Jin-Ping, Christine Lagard have in common: Most are among the 100 best CEO bloggers

WHAT do Branson, Gates, Obama, Musk, Xi Jin-Ping & Christine Lagard have in common? Most are among the best 100 CEO bloggers – find out who from DrKPI.

Update 2015-01-17: WEF Davos 2016: Top 100 CEO bloggers
Social media has been around for a while. Yes, various social network platforms have come and gone, like Bebo. Founded in 2006 to compete with Facebook, it was relaunched in December 2014, but has not really been heard from since.

Is social media for breakfast pictures or milestones?

Seems like a valid question, but this is also a time of growing digital fatigue.

We can share anything online. Unfortunately, this takes away opportunities for having a real conversation with a real person.

How does WEF Davos cope with its fans’ digital fatigue? Yes, WEF Davos continues to tweet furiously and madly update Facebook.

BUT, is anybody listening; do you care? We investigated this a bit further. See also:

WEF Davos in DrKPI’s Benchmark Test: Survey says…!
WEF Davos 2015: Top 100 CEO bloggers
Facebook, viral marketing or #wef15 – why benchmark?

We all know that one of most CEOs’ undoubted skills is burnishing their own profile

For starters, the World Economic Forum provides CEOs a great podium to push their pet projects.

For instance, in 2015 Eric Schmidt talked about his Google Search and #endtrafficking project. But just like the Google Flu Trends and earthquake monitoring fads, Mr Schmidt has now moved on from #endtrafficking.

Last year, Marissa Mayer from Yahoo even managed to curate an image as a fashionista, hanging out with Anna Wintour, the editor of American Vogue. Anna Wintour is definitely not in Davos this year. Marissa Mayer might make it to Davos, unless she is ousted by her board of directors beforehand.

But how well does WEF Davos foster dialogue? Does it go beyond those attending?

1. Houston, we have a problem

Klaus Schwab states in interviews that WEF Davos’ strength lies in bringing together varying opinions. In turn, he feels that one also needs to listen to those with different opinions.

With social media, this means you must monitor your blog’s commenting system carefully. While any comment should be reviewed before being published to avoid spam, this work should be done quickly.

Incidentally, WEF Davos rarely if ever gets a blog comment. This would suggest that its resonance with the public (i.e. readers) and delegates is not that wonderful. In such a situation we must monitor comments carefully, release them in a timely fashion, and most importantly, answer the questions raised by our readers.

But as the example below shows, there seems to be a bug in the system, which fails to publish reader input. The comment was left here: WEF provides the hashtags
[su_custom_gallery source=”media: 1294″ limit=”7″ link=”image” target=”blank” width=”530px” height=”750px” Title=”If you do not publish the few comments you get, are you engaging in the conversation or still following Web 1.0 = broadcasting?” alt=”If you do not publish the few comments you get, are you engaging in the conversation or still following Web 1.0 = broadcasting?”]

Mr Schwab talks about engaging and dialoguing often. I am pretty certain that he is very serious about this. Unfortunately, his social media and content marketing staff seem to fail him.

But DrKPI is ready to come to their rescue if they would just ask. Besides, this entry shows that WEF is failing the engagement challenge, but its staff seem to know that better than anyone else. That is to say, whenever they talk about their social media efforts, you would think everything is just peachy-keen.

Of course, arrogance or too much self-confidence is probably a form of ignorance… or vice versa?

Whatever it is, Davos 2016 must do better in this regard. Otherwise, the attention it gets through traditional media will not be carried further by the people – an important factor in getting things done after the meeting closes.

[su_box title=”3 things we learned from WEF Davos about Social Media” box_color=”#86bac5″ title_color=”#ffffff” radius=”5″ width=”px 700″ ]

When these three things happen, be quick and fix the problem – or face the consequences. Whatever you do, DON’T continue in the same vein!

1. Comment ended up in the spam inbox and got lost, deleted or whatever: Possibly an explanation, BUT not an excuse!

2. You just ignore the comment: If you want dialogue, this is a non-starter!

3. You delete the comment: A HUGE no-no if you listen to Klaus Schwab, who wants to foster dialogue and have different opinions be heard!

Whatever the reason, none of the above is excusable. Surely, it stops any conversation from ever starting.

Experience: I left a comment (see above). It is still in the list of ‘to be moderated’ comments on the Disqus platform, which is what WEF uses.

Of course, any true blogger could have told the WEF folks, as I did a while back, that using Disqus is not a great move. That is, if you want to foster more dialogue.

But WEF probably does not know any better.

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2. We all make mistakes, but failing to learn is plain stupid

For the last eight to ten years, experts have pointed out that in Web 2.0, broadcasting is out. Instead, engagement with your fans, clients, enemies, and so forth, is in.

“Mastering the Fourth Industrial Revolution” is the theme for WEF Davos 2016, in addition to other interesting and very important topics. The WEF has used social media extensively for quite a few years.

But has WEF continued fine-tuning its social media use effectively?

I began monitoring these efforts in 2008. They were quite good then, and got better by 2011, but since…

If you look at either the 2016 agenda pages or WEF events the comments are always closed when the blog entry is posted (see below).

Do we have dialogue here? Or is WEF Davos 2016 once again following the classic broadcasting model?
Tweet updates come fast and furious, you can barely keep up. Over the months leading up to this year’s meeting, no dialogue has happened. Neither on its blog about Davos, nor any other channel.

Is this how one overcomes the audience’s possible social media fatigue to foster engagement?
[su_custom_gallery source=”media: 2960″ limit=”7″ link=”image” target=”blank” width=”780px” height=”766px” Title=”#WEF #WEFdavos Why talk is cheap. #bigfail: Plenty of broadcasting but ZERO dialogue with and engagement from readers and attendees” alt=”#WEF #WEFdavos Why talk is cheap. #bigfail, plenty of broadcasting but ZERO dialogue with and engagement from readers and attendees”]

We are barely a week out from WEF Davos 2016. Unfortunately, people are not discussing the event. “How can that be?” I ask. Or is the theme too abstract and buzzword like for many of us?

Mind you, cities with few or no cars will certainly look very different from what we experience now, no matter what city we find ourselves in. So the theme chosen by the WEF Davos 2016 organisers seems an important one and timely as well.

So why such paltry resonance on its blogs and social networks? What might be going wrong?

[su_box title=”WEF Davos 2016: 3 simple checks that show the problem” box_color=”#86bac5″ title_color=”#ffffff” radius=”5″ width=”px 700″ ]

It is not what you show or want me to believe (also called impression management). Instead the focus is on what you do. For instance:

– How well does WEF Davos manage to engage its readers on its blogs? Check: Reader Comments.
FAILED.

– Do your moderators do a good job and release the comments? Check: Cases I know – NOPE not done well.
FAILED.

– Do content authors / posters write replies that give readers added value? Maybe, but we cannot find ONE REPLY!
FAILED.

Incidentally, WEF Davos rarely if ever gets a blog comment. This would suggest that its resonance with the public (i.e. readers) and delegates is not that wonderful.

What do you think is the reason for this?

Does no one care?

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Davos 2015 had a set of hashtags. For Davos 2016, 10 days before the event I still could not find a blog entry on WEF telling me what to use. Seems unfortunate.

What is your take?

– What do you do to fight the possible social media fatigue of your target audience?
– What would you recommend WEF Davos do to foster greater engagement on their conference blog?
– How do you deal with this data deluge from Davos via Facebook and Twitter accounts?
– What would you recommend to a novice (ropes to skip)?

Incidentally, if you look at the tweets this last weekend (January 9 and 10, 2016) and WEF’s Twitter account, there is no apparent strategy regarding content or getting people hyped for WEF Davos 2016. What is going on, is a robot posting? Just watching the updates go by makes me feel dizzy.